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General, Journalism

Should Saleh be let into the US?

The question is, Should Yemeni ex-President Saleh be let into the United States now that the Gulf Co-Operative has brokered a deal that includes his political and criminal immunity in the wake of numerous deaths of protesters as they fought to expel him from power.

He’s stepped down and his vice-President is running the country and elections are supposedly in the future, yet there have been more clashes between protesters and security forces.

Saleh wants to come to the US for medical treatment, solely, the US State Department said.  Should we let that happen?  He needs the treatment, apparently, because of an attempt made on his life that injured him.  He was subsequently sent to Saudi Arabia for treatment.

Yemenis, many of them, want Saleh to be tried and prosecuted for his crimes, but want that to take place in Yemen especially.  Under the deal that opposition political groups agreed to, but not all, in Yemen Saleh cannot be prosecuted.  This has many people angered.

The US backed the GCC’s deal and considered Saleh a friend in the War on Terror as he allowed many CIA drone attacks, including the one that killed an American citizen in the Fall, Anwar Al-Awlaki, and later Awlaki’s own son, also an American citizen.  This was a contentious topic, if not suppressed or under-reported in the US.  The US doesn’t want to seem an ally to someone who was the antithesis of fair rule, just law and democracy, but perhaps that has never really been the case.  It is a game of shadows.

That’s aside, the question is, do you think Saleh should be granted a visa into the country to receive medical treatment, or should he be denied entry?
Sound off.
Cheers,
J.E. Krauss

Link to the article on Al Jazeera that spurred this though: Here

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About Jared Krauss

traveler, reader, thinker, writer, photographer, doer

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